Wednesday, April 16, 2014

          UC Hastings Center for WorkLife Law Awarded $225,000 Grant from NoVo Foundation

          Funds will enable WorkLife Law to develop information and tools that help low-income pregnant workers gain accommodations they need to keep jobs.

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          Center for WorkLife Law Director Professor Joan C. Williams

          San Francisco, CA--The Center for WorkLife Law at UC Hastings College of the Law has been awarded a $225,000 grant from NoVo Foundation. The grant will help in continuing the mission of the Center for WorkLife Law to advance women’s economic rights.

          The NoVo Foundation grant provides support for the Center for WorkLife Law’s Pregnancy Accommodation Working Group, a group dedicated to helping pregnant workers stay on the job while protecting their health and the health of their babies. Support from NoVo Foundation enables the Center for WorkLife Law to develop and disseminate information and tools to employment lawyers, Ob/gyn doctors, the larger medical community, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), employers, and employees to help ensure that low-income pregnant workers gain the accommodations they need to keep their jobs and maintain financial security for themselves and their families.

          “With this important partnership and support from the NoVo Foundation,” says Center for WorkLife Law Director Professor Joan C. Williams, “we will be able to help reduce vulnerability for low-income pregnant women so that they may move beyond poverty and achieve economic empowerment for themselves, their children, and their communities.”

          About NoVo Foundation

          NoVo Foundation is dedicated to catalyzing a transformation in global society, moving from a culture of domination to one of equality and partnership. The Foundation supports the development of capacities in people—individually and collectively—to help create a caring and balanced world. NoVo envisions a world that operates on the principles of mutual respect, collaboration, and civic participation, thereby reversing the old paradigm predicated on hierarchy, violence, and the subordination of girls and women.

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