Friday, October 04, 2013

          Faculty Citations: Evidence of Judicial Impact

          Court citations are one way of measuring a faculty's impact on the legal landscape.

          UC Hastings faculty members have had their work cited repeatedly by courts of all levels. This list, while not exhaustive by any means, shows the impressive influence of our scholars’ work.

          Margreth Barrett: State and federal courts have cited Professor Margreth Barrett’s work 10 times.

          John Diamond: Professor John Diamond’s work has been cited by state supreme courts 10 times.

          William S. Dodge: Federal courts have cited Professor William S. Dodge’s articles 18 times, including three cites by the U.S. Supreme Court.

          Scott Dodson: State and federal courts have cited Professor Scott Dodson’s articles nine times.

          David Faigman: State and federal courts have relied on Professor David Faigman’s seminal treatise Modern Scientific Evidence 84 times, with the U.S. Supreme Court relying on it twice.

          Joseph Grodin: California courts have cited Professor Joseph Grodin’s book The California State Constitution 15 times.

          Geoffrey Hazard: Professor Geoffrey Hazard’s books and articles have been cited by the U.S. Supreme Court 22 times.

          Mary Kay Kane: The late Chief Justice Rehnquist called Professor Mary Kay Kane’s treatise Federal Practice and Procedure “the universally accepted authority on federal practice.” It has been cited more than 10,000 times by federal courts, including 55 times by the U.S. Supreme Court.

          Charles Knapp: Professor Charles Knapp’s work has been cited by state and federal courts 10 times.

          Evan Lee: State and federal courts have cited Professor Evan Lee’s articles 32 times.

          John Leshy: The Arizona Supreme Court has cited Professor John Leshy’s book The Arizona State Constitution nine times.

          Rory Little: Professor Rory Little’s work has been cited 18 times by federal courts, including four times by the U.S. Supreme Court.

          Richard Marcus: The U.S. Supreme Court has cited Professor Richard Marcus eight times, including Semtek International, Inc. v. Lockheed Martin Corp. (2001), quoting his casebook, Civil Procedure: A Modern Approach (3d ed.).

          Leo Martinez: Professor Leo Martinez’s treatise New Appleman Insurance Law Practice Guide has been cited by state and federal courts eight times in the past three years.

          Melissa Nelken: State and federal courts have cited Professor Melissa Nelken’s articles 12 times.

          Roger Park: Professor Roger Park’s work on evidence has been cited by state and federal courts 34 times.

          Lois A. Weithorn: State and federal courts have cited Professor Lois A. Weithorn’s work on children 14 times.

          Read more from UC Hastings magazine here.

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