Tuesday, January 08, 2013

          MSL Student Dr. Robert Lustig Releases New Book "Fat Chance" on Tackling Obesity

          UCSF Professor and Hastings MSL student Dr. Robert Lustig has just released his new book "Fat Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease." The book is available on Amazon and an excerpt can be found here: http://tv.msnbc.com/2013/01/08/an-excerpt-from-dr-robert-lustigs-fat-chance/.

          Lustig has also recently been featured in several SF Gate articles discussing sugar as the "culprit behind obesity" and "defusing the health care time bomb"

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