Tuesday, August 13, 2013

          Professor Rory Little on the DOJ's "Sea Change" in Federal Sentencing Policies

          Federal prosecutors will no longer seek mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent drug offenders, part of a broad new effort to focus on violent crimes and national security while reducing the nation's gigantic prison population, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said Monday at a meeting of the American Bar Association in San Francisco.

          Holder described a sea change in federal law enforcement strategy that marks a significant turn away from the all-out "war on drugs" of the past 40 years. Join us for a compelling discussion, featuring UC Hastings College of Law Professor Rory Little, a nationally recognized authority on criminal litigation ethics, federal criminal law, appellate litigation, and constitutional issues.

          Listen to Little's analysis here.

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          Prof. Veena Dubal's Objection on behalf of Uber Drivers featured in LA Times

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