Tuesday, May 06, 2014

          UC Hastings Center for WorkLife Law Awarded $100,000 Grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation

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          Partnership to help "reduce vulnerability for low-income pregnant women," says Professor Joan Williams, Center for WorkLife Law Director.

          San Francisco, CA--The Center for WorkLife Law at UC Hastings College of the Law has been awarded a $100,000 grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. The grant will help in continuing the mission of the Center for WorkLife Law to advance women’s economic rights.

          The W.K. Kellogg Foundation grant provides support for the Center for WorkLife Law’s Pregnancy Accommodation Working Group, a group dedicated to helping pregnant workers stay on the job while protecting their health and the health of their babies. Support from the Kellogg Foundation enables the Center for WorkLife Law to develop and disseminate information and tools to employment lawyers, Ob/gyn doctors, the larger medical community, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), employers, and employees to help low-income pregnant workers gain the accommodations they need to keep their jobs and maintain financial security for themselves and their families.

          “With this important partnership and support from the Kellogg Foundation,” says Center for WorkLife Law Director Professor Joan Williams, “we will be able to help reduce vulnerability for low-income pregnant women by helping them keep their jobs and secure their lives and the lives of their children. Employment for a low-income woman means her children are less vulnerable and have more opportunities to succeed in school and in life.”

          About W.K. Kellogg Foundation

          The W.K. Kellogg Foundation, founded in 1930 by breakfast cereal pioneer Will Keith Kellogg, is among the largest philanthropic foundations in the United States. Based in Battle Creek, Mich., WKKF engages with communities in priority places across the country and internationally to create conditions that propel vulnerable children to realize their full potential in school, work and life.

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