Thursday, July 24, 2014

          UC Hastings Center for WorkLife Law Awarded $40,000 Grant from Washington Center for Equitable Growth

          Funds will enable the Center to provide the labor, business and public policy communities with the academic research they need to make informed decisions that reduce inequality for potentially thousands of low-wage, hourly workers.
          Sample alt tag.
          Center for WorkLife Law Director Professor Joan C. Williams

          San Francisco, CA--The Center for WorkLife Law at UC Hastings College of the Law has been awarded a $40,000 grant from Washington Center for Equitable Growth.

          The Center is one of fifteen grantees that received support from Equitable Growth’s inaugural year of grantmaking. The grant will help in continuing the mission of the Center for WorkLife Law to advance women’s economic rights.

          The Equitable Growth grant provides support for the Center’s “Schedule Stability for Hourly Workers” project. Funds will support an in-depth analysis of the scheduling practices at the global retailer The Gap, Inc. The Center will widely publish its findings from the project to help inform employers about how scheduling practices impact productivity, absenteeism and turnover. The project’s findings have the potential to benefit thousands of low-income, hourly workers by increasing their economic stability and upward mobility.

          “With this important partnership and support from Washington Center for Equitable Growth,” says Center for WorkLife Law Director Professor Joan C. Williams, “we will be able to help low-income workers nationwide make their way out of poverty by providing them with stability in their jobs. Stable employment for a low-income, single mother means her children are less vulnerable and have more opportunities to reach their potential.”

          About Washington Center for Equitable Growth

          Washington Center for Equitable Growth is a new research and grantmaking organization founded to accelerate cutting-edge analysis into whether and how structural changes in the U.S. economy, particularly related to economic inequality, affect growth.

          ###

          Go to News Archive

          Share this Story

          Share via Facebook
          Share via TwitterShare via EmailPrint Friendly Version

          Other Recent Stories/ RSS

          Tuesday, August 23, 2016

          3L Tiffany Ku Leverages San Francisco Tech Background at U.S. Department of Homeland Security

          As part of the Technology Programs Division within the Office of the General Counsel at DHS, Ku worked on government contracts, trademark issues, and cybersecurity policy.
          Monday, August 22, 2016

          Joshua Arce '00 is Running for San Francisco Board of Supervisors

          After 15 years as a civil rights and environmental attorney, he’s campaigning on a social justice platform.
          Thursday, August 11, 2016

          Adante Pointer '03: Fighting For Justice For Victims Of Fatal Police Shootings

          The civil rights attorney has represented the families of Mario Woods, Oscar Grant and Alex Nieto. 
          Wednesday, August 10, 2016

          2L Molly Nevius: Working for the Future of Reproductive Rights

          "I really believe that law students in particular have a unique responsibility to address the harm that institutional powers have created, and I hope to be a part of that."
          Wednesday, August 03, 2016

          UC Hastings Prof. Rory Little Leads Supreme Court Panel at ABA Annual Meeting

          “Review of the Supreme Court’s Term, Criminal Cases” on Friday, August 5, at 2 pm
          Go to News Archive