Thursday, July 24, 2014

          UC Hastings Center for WorkLife Law Awarded $40,000 Grant from Washington Center for Equitable Growth

          Funds will enable the Center to provide the labor, business and public policy communities with the academic research they need to make informed decisions that reduce inequality for potentially thousands of low-wage, hourly workers.
          Sample alt tag.
          Center for WorkLife Law Director Professor Joan C. Williams

          San Francisco, CA--The Center for WorkLife Law at UC Hastings College of the Law has been awarded a $40,000 grant from Washington Center for Equitable Growth.

          The Center is one of fifteen grantees that received support from Equitable Growth’s inaugural year of grantmaking. The grant will help in continuing the mission of the Center for WorkLife Law to advance women’s economic rights.

          The Equitable Growth grant provides support for the Center’s “Schedule Stability for Hourly Workers” project. Funds will support an in-depth analysis of the scheduling practices at the global retailer The Gap, Inc. The Center will widely publish its findings from the project to help inform employers about how scheduling practices impact productivity, absenteeism and turnover. The project’s findings have the potential to benefit thousands of low-income, hourly workers by increasing their economic stability and upward mobility.

          “With this important partnership and support from Washington Center for Equitable Growth,” says Center for WorkLife Law Director Professor Joan C. Williams, “we will be able to help low-income workers nationwide make their way out of poverty by providing them with stability in their jobs. Stable employment for a low-income, single mother means her children are less vulnerable and have more opportunities to reach their potential.”

          About Washington Center for Equitable Growth

          Washington Center for Equitable Growth is a new research and grantmaking organization founded to accelerate cutting-edge analysis into whether and how structural changes in the U.S. economy, particularly related to economic inequality, affect growth.

          ###

          Go to News Archive

          Share this Story

          Share via Facebook
          Share via TwitterShare via EmailPrint Friendly Version

          Other Recent Stories/ RSS

          Wednesday, March 22, 2017

          We’re #1: UC Hastings Trial Team Wins National Ethics Trial Competition

          The UC Hastings Trial Team keeps bringing home the gold with another first place finish.
          Wednesday, March 22, 2017

          Tracking the Future of the Affordable Care Act

          UCSF/UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science and Health Policy launches Health Reform Tracker website.
          Tuesday, March 21, 2017

          UC Hastings LL.M. student Simren Delaney works with early stage Bay Area startups

          Now in its 7th year, the Startup Legal Garage enables UC Hastings students to work with early stage Tech and BioTech companies to provide them with corporate and intellectual property legal services under the supervision of leading attorneys throughout the Bay Area.
          Tuesday, March 14, 2017

          Message from Dean Faigman: US News Rankings

          While it is an annual rite of spring for deans to celebrate or lament the widely variable swings in rankings from year-to-year, UC Hastings must keep its eyes on what counts. We are doing that.
          Tuesday, March 07, 2017

          What Worked for Us May Work for You: Alumni Share Bar Success Stories for New Blog

          UC Hastings launches the Bar Passage Success Stories and Strategies blog.
          Go to News Archive