Thursday, July 24, 2014

          UC Hastings Center for WorkLife Law Awarded $40,000 Grant from Washington Center for Equitable Growth

          Funds will enable the Center to provide the labor, business and public policy communities with the academic research they need to make informed decisions that reduce inequality for potentially thousands of low-wage, hourly workers.
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          Center for WorkLife Law Director Professor Joan C. Williams

          San Francisco, CA--The Center for WorkLife Law at UC Hastings College of the Law has been awarded a $40,000 grant from Washington Center for Equitable Growth.

          The Center is one of fifteen grantees that received support from Equitable Growth’s inaugural year of grantmaking. The grant will help in continuing the mission of the Center for WorkLife Law to advance women’s economic rights.

          The Equitable Growth grant provides support for the Center’s “Schedule Stability for Hourly Workers” project. Funds will support an in-depth analysis of the scheduling practices at the global retailer The Gap, Inc. The Center will widely publish its findings from the project to help inform employers about how scheduling practices impact productivity, absenteeism and turnover. The project’s findings have the potential to benefit thousands of low-income, hourly workers by increasing their economic stability and upward mobility.

          “With this important partnership and support from Washington Center for Equitable Growth,” says Center for WorkLife Law Director Professor Joan C. Williams, “we will be able to help low-income workers nationwide make their way out of poverty by providing them with stability in their jobs. Stable employment for a low-income, single mother means her children are less vulnerable and have more opportunities to reach their potential.”

          About Washington Center for Equitable Growth

          Washington Center for Equitable Growth is a new research and grantmaking organization founded to accelerate cutting-edge analysis into whether and how structural changes in the U.S. economy, particularly related to economic inequality, affect growth.

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