Thursday, February 12, 2015

          CGRS Releases Book-Length Regional Study on Children and Migration

          The Center for Gender and Refugee Studies at UC Hastings has released a new study: Childhood, Migration, and Human Rights.
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          Unprecedented in scope, Childhood and Migration in Central and North America: Causes, Policies, Practices and Challenges is the result of a two-year regional investigation into the treatment of Honduran, Salvadoran, Guatemalan, Mexican, and United States citizen and permanent resident children affected by migration.

          The Center for Gender and Refugee Studies at UC Hastings is proud to announce its new book-length study on children affected by migration in the Northern Central America–Mexico–United States corridor.

          CGRS and the Center for Justice and Human Rights at the National University of Lanús, Argentina directed the study in partnership with civil society organizations in each of the five countries examined. The book assesses root causes of the forced migration of children and families, and analyzes relevant regional and binational accords. The authors conclude that laws, policies, and practices throughout the region systematically violate the human rights of migrant children and children of migrant parents.

          The book calls upon Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, and the United States to reform laws and policies and to develop a regional response to protect the rights of children affected by migration. These include children’s rights to life, safety, family, development, due process, and international protection, and to have their best interests considered as a primary factor in all decisions affecting them.

          CGRS Associate Director and Managing Attorney Lisa Frydman, a specialist in immigrant children’s rights and asylum law, explains, “Rather than focus on increasing immigration enforcement in Mexico and the United States, the countries of the region should concentrate on addressing violence and other drivers of migration, ensuring full and fair access to asylum and other forms of relief, and upholding human rights.”

          The full report is available here. A press release from CGRS with detailed contact information is available here. For media inquiries, please contact Lisa Frydman, frydmanl@uchastings.edu, or Karen Musalo, musalok@uchastings.edu, Director of the Center for Gender & Refugee Studies at UC Hastings College of the Law.


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